so if you know #gmic (https://gmic.eu) it can work with luts (colour lookup tables). and gmic comes with a set of tables by itself.

so it is easy to apply luts to images by using these default luts. i don’t know yet how those luts originated, did anyone test, for instance, films, shooting colour checkers under reference light, but i wanted to see how the luts look. all of them. so i made a small script which callse gmic with all presets.

gmic -input $i map_clut $l -output ${j}_${l}.jpg

and now i can compare those. as $l represents lut name, the names of files have lut in them. i did not choose any particularly good image in terms of colours or scene, just something what i found in my phone that day.

so you can find my tests at http://norayr.am/gmic_test/0/ and http://norayr.am/gmic_test/1/ #lut #graphics #photo

բնօրինակ սփիւռքում(եւ մեկնաբանութիւննե՞ր)

If you’ve ever wondered why people say tools like Scribus aren’t ready for professional production work let me share this blog post by @davidrevoy

https://www.davidrevoy.com/article747/the-english-book-printed-project-production-report-2

This should be a slam dunk. David knows what he’s doing and One Bookshelf provides instructions that clearly show how to produce a PDF to their specifications.

We need to do better, folks. Color Profiles that work for everyone except FOSS tools are unacceptable. Period. There are no excuses for this.

source #scribus #graphics #foss #libresoftware #printing

բնօրինակ սփիւռքում(եւ մեկնաբանութիւննե՞ր)